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Emblem for Queen’s Diamond Jubilee (if she doesn’t die before then) revealed

A 10-year-old girl has won a competition to design the official emblem for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee to be held next year, providing Her Majesty doesn’t die before then.

Katherine Dewar, from Chester, was chosen from 35,000 entries in a nationwide competition run by BBC children’s programme Blue Peter.

The design will appear on everything from posters to commemorative tea cups, as long as the Queen lives that long.

Katherine said she was ‘cautiously excited’ that her design was going to be used, assuming the Queen makes it through till February 2012, but ‘didn’t want to get her hopes up too much in case she dies.’

‘It was great to see my design turned from a drawing into a print that could be used on so many things if she lives another year. ‘It would be great seeing people waving flags with my design on, but the Queen is already older than my nan was when she died of a stroke’

One of the judges of the Blue Peter competition, branding expert Martin Lambie-Nairn, said, ‘The result is beautiful, fresh and practical. I hope it gets used, but that ultimately depends on the Queen not dying for another year.’

Tim Levell, editor of Blue Peter, said the programme was ‘blown away’ by the response to the competition, especially given that there’s no guarantee that the Queen would be alive next year.

‘The Royal Family and particularly The Queen are clearly much-loved by our audience, and they will be very upset when death comes to her, as indeed it must.’

The top 30 children across the three age categories – including Katherine – have been provisionally invited to a special tea party at Buckingham Palace next month to celebrate their achievements, although this will also be called off if the Queen passes away in the next few weeks.

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Posted: Feb 22nd, 2011 by Golgo13

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